Loudoun Water operates seven Community Systems. Community Water and Wastewater Systems are free standing water and wastewater systems whereby water may be supplied to a rural village or hamlet by its own community well and wastewater may be treated in the village/hamlets by the village's own packaged treatment facility. Highly treated wastewater (effluent) is discharged in most cases on site or, in a few cases, to local streams/rivers. Community system capacities are limited in nature and may not be designed to provide all of the amenities offered by the central system, such as fire flow and lawn watering. Most Loudoun Water customers are connected to the Central System.

Important Notice for Community Systems Customers:  New rates and quarterly billing took effect on April 1, 2016. 

Our Community Systems:
Beacon Hill

Water is supplied to selected Beacon Hill hamlets by two community wells. Water is treated with disinfectant and an oxidant and filtered to remove any impurities and assure water quality does not degrade in the distribution system. The system includes a storage tank to help meet the demands of peak-use periods.

Courtland Rural Village

Water is supplied to Courtland Rural Village from Loudoun Water's central system, which serves eastern Loudoun County. Wastewater will be collected and treated to a high degree at the community's own wastewater treatment plant. Here, most organic material and nutrients will be removed through biological treatment before being disinfected and stored in a holding pond prior to discharge on several spray irrigation fields in the development. Access to these fields will be restricted, as the irrigation system may start on a timer and starts without prior warning.
 

Lenah Run

On December 9, 2014, Lenah Run was connected to the central system for potable (drinking) water. On June 17, 2016, the wastewater flow from Lenah Run was officially connected to the Loudoun Water central system.  The community wastewater system is no longer operating. 

Raspberry Falls

Loudoun Water is proceeding with the design and construction of a single water treatment plant to serve all of the water needs of both the Raspberry Falls and Selma Estates communities. The plant will be located in Selma Estates. This site is most suitable for water distribution since it is located at a higher elevation than Raspberry Falls and gravity can be utilized for reliability and cost effectiveness.The plant will use membrane filtration for pathogen/bacteria removal. The membrane treatment facility will be comprised of several components, including pumps, strainers and storage tanks, in addition to the membrane filter units.The plant will be sized based on the maximum daily usage observed over the past six years, which is 900 gallons per day per connection. The treatment plant is planned to be operational in late 2017. Loudoun Water will fund the capital costs of the new water treatment system through its general fund. The general fund will be replenished over time through user rates received from all Loudoun Water customers. More information can be found under Current Projects.

Currently, water is supplied to Raspberry Falls by two community wells, and wastewater is collected and treated to a high degree at the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Most organic material and nutrients are removed through biological treatment before being disinfected and discharged to an unnamed tributary of Limestone Branch. 

Additional information on the progress of the new water treatment system can be found here.

Selma Estates

Loudoun Water is proceeding with the design and construction of a single water treatment plant to serve all of the water needs of both the Raspberry Falls and Selma Estates communities. The plant will be located in Selma Estates. This site is most suitable for water distribution since it is located at a higher elevation than Raspberry Falls and gravity can be utilized for reliability and cost effectiveness.The plant will use membrane filtration for pathogen/bacteria removal. The membrane treatment facility will be comprised of several components, including pumps, strainers and storage tanks, in addition to the membrane filter units. The plant will be sized based on the maximum daily usage observed over the past six years, which is 900 gallons per day per connection. The treatment plant is planned to be operational in late 2017. Loudoun Water will fund the capital costs of the new water treatment system through its general fund. The general fund will be replenished over time through user rates received from all Loudoun Water customers. More information can be found under Current Projects.

Currently, the Selma Estates community drinking water treatment system consists of four drilled wells, one 165,000 gallon ground storage tank, three booster pumps, a 5,000 gallon hydropneumatic storage tank, a sodium hypochlorite feed facility, a greensand filtration unit, a fluoride feed system, an orthophosphate feed system, a standby generator and the pipes comprising the distribution system. The hypochlorination together with the atmospheric storage tank is capable of providing 4-log inactivation of virus treatment. Wastewater is collected and treated to a high degree at the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Here, most organic material and nutrients are removed through biological treatment before being disinfected and discharged to an unnamed tributary of Limestone Branch.

Additional information on the progress of the new water treatment system can be found here.
 

The Reserve at Rokeby

Water is supplied to The Reserve at Rokeby by four community wells. Water is treated with disinfectant to ensure water quality does not degrade in the distribution system. The system includes a storage tank to help meet the demands of peak-use periods.

Village Green at Elysian Heights

Water is supplied to Elysian Heights by five community wells. Water quality from these wells is high, and the only form of treatment provided to the water is the addition of fluoride to help prevent cavities and a disinfectant to aid in assuring that water quality does not degrade in the distribution system. The system includes a storage tank to help meet the demands of peak usage periods and to provide water during temporary power losses.Wastewater is collected and treated to a high degree at the wastewater treatment plant. At the plant, most organic material and nutrients are removed through biological treatment before being disinfected and discharged to an unnamed tributary of Limestone Branch.